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Tuesday, August 11, 2020

Trump wants to reopen US for business in weeks

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Trump wants to reopen US for business 'in weeks' President Donald Trump has said he wants to reopen the US for business in weeks, not months, as he claimed continued closures could result in more deaths than Covid-19 itself. "We can't have the cure be worse than the problem," Mr Trump told reporters at a press briefing on Monday, echoing a tweet he sent late on Sunday. "We have to open our country because that causes problems that, in my opinion, could be far bigger problems." Mr Trump acknowledged there were trade-offs, but claimed, without apparent evidence, that if closures stretched on for months there would be "probably more death from that than anything that we're talking about with respect to the virus". The comments were further evidence that Mr Trump has grown impatient with the pandemic, even before it has reached its expected peak. In recent days, tensions have been rising between those who argue the country needs to get back up and running to prevent a deep economic depression, and medical experts who warn that, unless more extreme action is taken, the human cost will be catastrophic. Health experts have made clear that unless Americans continue to dramatically limit social interaction - staying home from work and isolating themselves - the number of infections will overwhelm the health care system, as it has in parts of Italy, leading to many more deaths. While the worst outbreaks are concentrated in certain parts of the country, such as New York, experts warn the highly infectious disease is certain to spread. But with the economic impact now snapping into focus with millions out of work, businesses shut and stock markets in freefall - all undermining Mr Trump's reelection message - the chorus of backlash is growing louder. "We can't shut in the economy. The economic cost to individuals is just too great," Larry Kudlow, Mr Trump's top economic adviser, said in an interview on Monday on Fox News Channel. "The president is right. The cure can't be worse than the disease, and we're going to have to make some difficult trade-offs." That opinion has been echoed by others in the White House, some Republicans in Congress and on Fox, where host Steve Hilton delivered a monologue on Sunday night that appeared to have, at least partially, inspired Mr Trump's tweet. "You know that famous phrase, the cure is worse than the disease? That is exactly the territory we're hurtling towards," Hilton told his viewers, describing the economic, social and human impact of the shutdown as an "even bigger crisis" than the virus. "You think it's just the coronavirus that kills people? This total economic shutdown will kill people," he said, pointing to growing poverty and despair. The White House, which for the last two weeks has largely allowed doctors to lead the administration's response, already seemed to be shifting in that direction. "I'm not looking at months, I can tell you right now," Mr Trump said on Monday, adding America would soon be back open for business. He added, however, that states could continue to enforce stricter measures. Mr Trump tweeted that he would be waiting until the end of the current 15-day period of recommended closures and self-isolation to make any decisions. At the same time, the Centres for Disease Control and Prevention was exploring new guidance making it possible for people working in "critical infrastructure" jobs who have been exposed to the virus to return to work faster "by wearing a mask for a certain period of time," Vice President Mike Pence said. It's a change in tone that is drawing criticism from public health experts, who suggested Mr Trump risked making a dangerous mistake if he sets up a conflict between public health and the nation's economic well-being, given how unlikely it is that the threat posed by the virus will subside in another week. If the US stops social distancing too soon, "you will have more deaths and more dives in the stock market," warned Lawrence Gostin of Georgetown University, a lawyer with extensive public health expertise. And the outbreak could come surging back once people return to their normal routines of commuting, working, dining out and socialising - further stressing the economy. John Auerbach, president of the non-partisan Trust for America's Health, which works with governments at all levels, said widespread illness and death also had a powerful economic impact that was impossible to ignore or understate. "If you don't flatten the curve and minimise those who are getting infected, the amount of sickness will cripple business," Mr Auerbach said. Even Republican senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, a close Trump ally, urged Mr Trump to stick with the advice of public health officials. "There is no functioning economy unless we control the virus," he warned on Twitter. "Try running an economy with major hospitals overflowing, doctors and nurses forced to stop treating some because they can't help all, and every moment of gut-wrenching medical chaos being played out in our living rooms, on TV, on social media, and shown all around the world." Published: 24/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Johnson facing questions over coronavirus lockdown

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Johnson facing questions over coronavirus lockdown Boris Johnson is facing calls for clarity after placing the UK on a police-enforced lockdown with drastic new measures in the fight against the coronavirus outbreak. The Prime Minister ordered people only to leave their homes under a list of "very limited purposes", banned public gatherings of more than two people and ordered the closure of non-essential shops. But police chiefs warned of phone lines being inundated with calls on Monday night with questions about what movements are still permitted, while MPs also called for answers. In an address to the nation from Downing Street, Mr Johnson ordered people to only leave their homes to shop for basic necessities "as infrequently as possible", and to only perform one form of exercise a day. They can also seek medical help, provide care to a vulnerable person or travel to work if "absolutely necessary", under the measures to last until at least Easter Monday. "That's all - these are the only reasons you should leave your home," he said. "You should not be meeting friends. If your friends ask you to meet, you should say no. You should not be meeting family members who do not live in your home." A failure to follow the rules could see police dispersing gatherings and imposing fines, which Government officials said would start at £30. After the UK death toll hit 335, the PM ordered the immediate closure of non-essential stores including those selling electronics and clothing. Sports Direct came in for heavy criticism for keeping its stores open after the Prime Minister's announcement. Management justified the move on the basis that selling sporting and fitness equipment makes the company a vital asset during a national shutdown, according to an email seen by the PA news agency. Labour Party chairman Ian Lavery questioned the decision, tweeting: "Who on earth does Mike Ashley think he is? He's prepared to endanger the life of his employees and the public at large." The Prime Minister also ordered a ban on all public gatherings of more than two people - other than those they live with. Other premises to join pubs and restaurants in being closed are libraries, playgrounds, outdoor gyms, places of worship and hotels. Parks will remain open for exercise, but all social events including weddings and baptisms will be stopped. Funerals can continue. Mr Johnson said the measures will be "under constant review" and will be considered for relaxation in three weeks if the evidence allows. Politicians who had piled pressure on the PM to enforce strict measures amid fears people were disregarding social distancing advice largely welcomed his announcement. But there were calls for answers to the public's concerns after the PM scrapped his daily press conference on Monday to announce the measures in a statement. Northamptonshire Police Chief Constable Nick Adderley warned the public not to "cripple our phone" lines with enquiries on the PM's announcement. Lincolnshire Police warned of an "extremely high volume" of calls, and Humberside Chief Constable Lee Freeman said his force had received "a number of calls" on the subject which he said he was unable to answer. Labour leader Jeremy Corbyn said: "There now needs to be clear guidance to employers and workers about which workplaces should close - and the Government must close the loopholes to give security to all workers, including the self-employed, as well as renters and mortgage holders." Scottish First Minister Nicola Sturgeon said the measures that "amount to a lockdown" were "essential for the protection of all of us". Ironically, hours after the PM placed the UK on lockdown, China said it was lifting restrictions on movement in most areas of Hubei province on Wednesday, ending a lockdown in the place coronavirus first surfaced. Mr Johnson, whose announcement prompted a surge of traffic to online supermarket websites, is to hold a Cabinet meeting on Tuesday morning, but some ministers will be joining online instead of heading to Downing Street. Forty-six more people died in England alongside four in Scotland and four in Wales on Monday, taking the number who have died in British hospitals after testing positive to 335. Those who have died in England range in age from 18 to 105. In an earlier escalation of advice, Foreign Secretary Dominic Raab told citizens travelling overseas to return to the UK using commercial routes that are still running. "If you are on holiday abroad the time to come home is now while you still can," he said. Foreign Office staff are working to help citizens get back where routes have been halted due to the crisis. Meanwhile, emergency legislation to tackle the outbreak cleared the House of Commons after MPs chose not to oppose the third reading of the Coronavirus Bill. Published: 24/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Woman charged with murder after fatal West London car crash

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Woman charged with murder after fatal West London car crash A woman has been charged with murder and attempted murder following a fatal car crash in west London, Scotland Yard said. Police were called at about 12.50am to Salisbury St, Acton, after a 54-year-old man died when he was struck by a car. The driver left the car and attacked another man, who was not seriously injured. Police said Rhian Beresford, 28, of Hope Gardens, W3 was charged early on Tuesday with murder and attempted murder. She is being held in custody and will appear at Ealing Magistrates' Court later on Tuesday. Published: 24/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Johnson You must stay at home UK in lockdown

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Johnson: You must stay at home - UK in lockdown Prime Minister Boris Johnson has outlined new restrictions on people leaving their homes to help slow the spread of coronavirus as he gave an address to the nation from No10 on Monday evening. Here is his statement in full: Good Evening, The coronavirus is the biggest threat this country has faced for decades - and this country is not alone. All over the world we are seeing the devastating impact of this invisible killer. And so tonight I want to update you on the latest steps we are taking to fight the disease and what you can do to help. And I want to begin by reminding you why the UK has been taking the approach that we have. Without a huge national effort to halt the growth of this virus, there will come a moment when no health service in the world could possibly cope; because there won't be enough ventilators, enough intensive care beds, enough doctors and nurses. And as we have seen elsewhere, in other countries that also have fantastic health care systems, that is the moment of real danger. To put it simply, if too many people become seriously unwell at one time, the NHS will be unable to handle it - meaning more people are likely to die, not just from coronavirus but from other illnesses as well. So it's vital to slow the spread of the disease. Because that is the way we reduce the number of people needing hospital treatment at any one time, so we can protect the NHS's ability to cope - and save more lives. And that's why we have been asking people to stay at home during this pandemic. And though huge numbers are complying - and I thank you all - the time has now come for us all to do more. From this evening I must give the British people a very simple instruction - you must stay at home. Because the critical thing we must do is stop the disease spreading between households. That is why people will only be allowed to leave their home for the following very limited purposes: - shopping for basic necessities, as infrequently as possible - one form of exercise a day - for example a run, walk, or cycle - alone or with members of your household; - any medical need, to provide care or to help a vulnerable person; and - travelling to and from work, but only where this is absolutely necessary and cannot be done from home. That's all - these are the only reasons you should leave your home. You should not be meeting friends. If your friends ask you to meet, you should say No. You should not be meeting family members who do not live in your home. You should not be going shopping except for essentials like food and medicine - and you should do this as little as you can. And use food delivery services where you can. If you don't follow the rules the police will have the powers to enforce them, including through fines and dispersing gatherings. To ensure compliance with the Government's instruction to stay at home, we will immediately: - close all shops selling non-essential goods,? including clothing and electronic stores and other premises including libraries, playgrounds and outdoor gyms, and places of worship; - we will stop all gatherings of more than two people in public - excluding people you live with; - and we'll stop all social events?, including weddings, baptisms and other ceremonies, but excluding funerals. Parks will remain open for exercise but gatherings will be dispersed. No Prime Minister wants to enact measures like this. I know the damage that this disruption is doing and will do to people's lives, to their businesses and to their jobs. And that's why we have produced a huge and unprecedented programme of support both for workers and for business. And I can assure you that we will keep these restrictions under constant review. We will look again in three weeks, and relax them if the evidence shows we are able to. But at present there are just no easy options. The way ahead is hard, and it is still true that many lives will sadly be lost. And yet it is also true that there is a clear way through. Day by day we are strengthening our amazing NHS with 7,500 former clinicians now coming back to the service. With the time you buy - by simply staying at home - we are increasing our stocks of equipment. We are accelerating our search for treatments. We are pioneering work on a vaccine. And we are buying millions of testing kits that will enable us to turn the tide on this invisible killer. I want to thank everyone who is working flat out to beat the virus. Everyone from the supermarket staff to the transport workers to the carers to the nurses and doctors on the frontline. But in this fight we can be in no doubt that each and every one of us is directly enlisted. Each and every one of us is now obliged to join together, to halt the spread of this disease, to protect our NHS and to save many many thousands of lives. And I know that as they have in the past so many times, the people of this country will rise to that challenge. And we will come through it stronger than ever. We will beat the coronavirus and we will beat it together. And therefore I urge you at this moment of national emergency to stay at home, protect our NHS and save lives. Thank you. Published: 23/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Digger used in midnight ram raids on ATMs at Tesco store

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Digger used in midnight ram-raids on ATMs at Tesco store Thieves have used a huge digger to carry out a ram-raid on a Tesco Extra store in Kent. ATMs were ripped from the wall in the midnight heist and two police vehicles which tried to stop the criminals getting away were smashed. The raid comes as staff at supermarkets across the country have been working around the clock during the coronavirus crisis to ensure shelves are stocked ready for openings. Tesco said the Whitfield store near Dover remained open on Monday as police launched an investigation to track down those responsible. Police say that two cash machines were wrenched off the wall and loaded onto a flat-bed truck during the raid at about 12.30am on Monday. It is not yet known how much cash was in the ATMs. The truck carrying them off was driven away in convoy with two Mitsubishi Shoguns. Officers tried to stop the group but two police vehicles were rammed and damaged in Old Park Hill in Dover during the getaway. No serious injuries were reported, Kent Police said. Detectives are urgently trying to locate those responsible. Anyone who witnessed the incident or has CCTV or dashcam footage that may assist the investigation is urged to call the appeal line on 01622 604100, quoting reference 46/52654/20. You can also call the independent charity Crimestoppers anonymously on 0800 555111 or complete an online form at www.crimestoppers-uk.org. A Tesco spokesman said: "Our Dover Extra is open and serving customers as normal following the incident last night and we're helping police with their inquiries." Published: 23/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Lottery winner gives away potatoes to self isolating families

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Lottery winner gives away potatoes to self-isolating families A lottery winner has hit back at "selfish" stockpilers by distributing thousands of free potatoes from her farm to her local community. Susan Herdman saved the potatoes - which were due to be ploughed back into the ground after the recent wet weather - and offered them free of charge to people in Boroughbridge, North Yorkshire. Ms Herdman and her family hand-picked the vegetables from the 27-acre plot and delivered them personally to self-isolating families. The 51-year-old, who moved from Herefordshire to live on the farm after her £1.2 million win on the National Lottery in 2010, said she was inundated with messages after she offered the potatoes on Facebook. Published: 23/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Covid 19 Health Secretary says those ignoring advice are selfish

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Covid-19: Health Secretary says those ignoring advice are 'selfish' People who are ignoring social distancing advice to stay two metres apart are "very selfish", the Health Secretary has said as he indicated further measures could be brought in to tackle Covid-19. In a sign that the UK could be moving towards greater lockdown, Matt Hancock said the Government was willing to take "more action" if needed to stop coronavirus from spreading. Over the weekend, photos emerged showing crowds of people visiting open spaces across many parts of the UK. The Government has said it is safe to exercise as long as people keep at least two metres away from other people. Emergency legislation that would grant powers aimed at tackling the pandemic will be debated by MPs later. Speaking on BBC Radio 4, Mr Hancock said he did not know why some people were ignoring the Government's advice. "It's very selfish," he said. "The NHS is doing everything it can and preparing for the spread of this virus. "If people go within two metres of others who they don't live with then they're helping to spread the virus - and the consequences of that costs lives and it means that, for everyone, this will go on for longer." Mr Hancock said ministers were prepared to take stricter measures to clamp down on the spread of the virus if necessary. Asked by the BBC whether he would move to telling people not to go out at all rather than simply advise against it, he said: "Yes, and on Saturday I signed the order to give the police the power to be able to shut bars, restaurants and pubs if they are still open. "This isn't the sort of thing I ever wanted to do but it is the sort of thing as a nation we have to be prepared to see to stop this virus. "These are unpleasant and very difficult times." Asked whether the Cabinet would be considering a firmer lockdown when it meets on Monday, Mr Hancock said: "Nothing is off the table. Of course we are looking at what other European countries are doing." And he said he hoped that the testing of medical staff would take place "as soon as possible" so that doctors, nurses and other NHS workers who may not have the virus but are self-isolating can get back to work. He told BBC Breakfast: "We are rapidly expanding testing. We have been buying testing kits over this weekend and all of last week to make sure we have as much as possible." He said he hoped to say more about the expansion of tests in the next few days. The Government has confirmed that all major hospitals have received deliveries of personal protective equipment needed by frontline staff and that a hotline has been set up for NHS workers to ring if there are shortages in their area. "I'm working day and night to get this protective equipment to the frontline," Mr Hancock said. "We have got enough of it. Of course we are going to need more and we are buying it too. "But it is about distributing it to the frontline. "We have done two things over the weekend. First, we have got a shipment out to all the major hospitals and the second is we now have a helpline so that if you are on the frontline and you can't get access to the equipment you need, you can phone in so we know where the shortages are." Mr Hancock also told the BBC that 12,000 ventilators are now available after last week's appeal by the PM, up from 5,000 that the NHS had access to previously. For Labour, shadow health secretary Jonathan Ashworth said ministers should be making "immediate preparations" for the "next stage" of tackling Covid-19 while learning from other European nations. The calls came as an 18-year-old was thought to have become the youngest victim of the virus in Britain as the number of deaths in the UK rose to 281. In Walsall, a 36-year-old nurse and mother-of-three is on a ventilator in intensive care after contracting coronavirus. Areema Nasreen is in a critical condition at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands where she works. There are growing fears that Britain is on a similar trajectory to Italy - scene of the world's worst outbreak - where the death toll passed 5,000 over the weekend. The Italian government was one of a number of European countries to announce new or extended restrictions - with Germany banning public gatherings of more than two people not from the same household. Meanwhile, respiratory doctors and nurses at Belfast Trust launched a video on Twitter saying people should stay at home to save lives. One medic there said she has been a doctor for 35 years, adding: "I'm Susie, we are facing our greatest challenge and we are frightened ... please stay at home." Labour MP Rosena Allin-Khan, who also works as an A&E doctor at St George's Hospital in south London, bitterly attacked the Government's approach. She said her latest shift had been a "deeply, deeply eye-opening" experience with previously fit and healthy people in their 30s and 40s "attached to machines, fighting for their lives". "The Prime Minister has been blase about this from the start, waiting for others to make decisions so he doesn't have to. It is costing lives," she said. "Enough is enough. The NHS cannot cope and it won't be long before doctors have to choose between who lives and who dies." While people were heading to open spaces, there were signs that city and town centres were closing down with Nando's, Costa Coffee, McDonald's, John Lewis, Primark and Timpson among the high street chains to announce they were closing their doors. Meanwhile, letters are going out to 1.5 million people with underlying health conditions who are considered to be the most vulnerable to the coronavirus telling them to stay at home for the next 12 weeks. The Government said it would ensure those without families and friends to support them would continue to receive food and medicines, with the military helping to organise deliveries. Published: 23/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Coronavirus brings UK economy to temporary standstill report

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Coronavirus brings UK economy to temporary standstill - report The coronavirus outbreak has brought the UK economy to a temporary standstill, according to a quarterly report. KPMG UK's latest quarterly Economic Outlook forecasts a 2.6% decline for 2020 - with flat growth predicted in the second half of the year. But a protracted outbreak of Covid-19 could also result in a more severe impact than the 2008-09 downturn with a 5.4% fall. In both scenarios though, the report suggests the country's economy is expected to recover by the second half of 2021 - assuming the public health measures put in place stem the rise in the number of cases. Yael Selfin, KPMG UK's chief economist, said: "The Covid-19 pandemic is first and foremost a human crisis. "But there will also be a very substantial negative impact on the global economy and the UK's economic performance this year and potentially next, but the economy is expected to recover by the second half of 2021. "Until we know how and when the Covid-19 outbreak will end, the scale of the negative economic impact will be difficult to quantify. "However, it is now almost certain that the UK is slipping into its first significant downturn in over a decade." On Friday, Chancellor Rishi Sunak said employers would be able to apply to HM Revenue and Customs to cover 80% of the wages of staff they keep on up to £2,500 a month. Economists have said the bill to taxpayers for the Government's unprecedented scheme could run to billions of pounds a month. The Bank of England also cut the base rate of interest to a record-low 0.1% to ease pressure during the pandemic. In Scotland, a £350 million support fund was announced to help those left struggling in the wake of the outbreak as part of Scottish Government measures worth around £1.9 billion. Catherine Burnet, senior partner at KPMG UK in Scotland, said: "The latest Economic Outlook data highlights the scale of the challenge facing businesses across Scotland. "Fiscal measures and immediate relief action from the Scottish and UK Governments have gone some way to help mitigate some of the damage, but there's widespread acknowledgement that more action will be needed in the coming months to keep the economy moving. "The business community also needs to work together more collaboratively than ever before to ensure we're playing our role in supporting employees, customers and wider society." Over the weekend, pubs, clubs, restaurants and other town centre staples were told to close by both Prime Minister Boris Johnson and First Minister Nicola Sturgeon. While the move itself is a bid to halt the spread of the virus, it has brought uncertainty to many employers even with the announced financial support. Mr Selfin added: "With the UK's government charged with meeting an ambitious timetable for its post-Brexit trading relationship with the EU, the scope for further economic uncertainty this year was already high. "However, the Covid-19 pandemic represents a far more dramatic short-term disruption to growth. "While both governments and central banks have moved quickly to offer fiscal and monetary policy support to the global economy, more will be needed to shore up the economy in the short term, including measures to help the most vulnerable businesses and households and prevent a deeper economic slump. "The impact of the pandemic will be far reaching. "It is likely Covid-19 will result in a massive expansion in government debt and this could threaten to dislodge the Government's original vision to 'level-up' the UK economy, long after the pandemic is past - leaving the Chancellor with a big challenge on his hands." Published: 23/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Princess Eugenie is turning 30

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Princess Eugenie is turning 30 The Queen's granddaughter, Princess Eugenie, is turning 30 on Monday. The milestone birthday of the youngest daughter of the Duke of York and Sarah, Duchess of York, will no doubt be very low-key as the nation is urged to stay at home to halt the spread of the coronavirus pandemic. Spirited, art-loving Eugenie, who often entertains royal fans by posting amusing images of herself as a youngster on Instagram, is 10th in line to the throne. The princess has shared a campaign on her Instagram Stories, urging people to give a national round of applause to NHS workers from their doors, balconies and windows at 8pm on Thursday. Eugenie married tequila brand ambassador Jack Brooksbank in a glittering royal wedding in 2018. She has been looking forward to the wedding of her sister, Princess Beatrice, to millionaire property tycoon Edoardo Mapelli Mozzi in May. But Beatrice's wedding plans have been thrown into disarray. Her wedding reception in the Buckingham Palace gardens has been cancelled because of the Covid-19 outbreak, and churches are limiting those attending marriage ceremonies to just the priest, the bride and groom and two witnesses. Eugenie's mother Sarah has said the past six months have been hard on her and her daughters with the scandal that has engulfed Andrew. The duke retired from public royal duties in November after his disastrous Newsnight interview about his friendship with convicted sex offender Jeffrey Epstein. Andrew has strenuously denied claims by Virginia Giuffre that he slept with her when she was 17 after she was trafficked by Epstein. The duke is facing calls to talk to the FBI and US prosecutors, but has previously been accused of having "completely shut the door" on any co-operation. Princess Eugenie Victoria Helena of York was born on March 23 1990 at the exclusive Portland Hospital in London. In a week-long name game, Andrew and the duchess kept the nation guessing as to what they would call their daughter. Their unusual choice generated much surprise and was inspired by the Victorian era. It was the second name of one of Queen Victoria's granddaughters. Eugenie was born sixth in line to the throne, but moved down to 10th following the arrival of the three Cambridge children and Archie Mountbatten-Windsor. She became the first royal baby to have a public christening when in 1990 she was baptised during morning service at St Mary Magdalene Church, Sandringham. Two years after she was born, Andrew and Sarah announced they were to separate. The duchess, nicknamed Fergie in the press, was responsible for sparking a major scandal in 1992 when she was snapped topless having her toes kissed by her financial adviser John Bryan. Andrew and Sarah divorced in 1996, amicably had joint custody of Eugenie and Beatrice, and have remained close. When she was 12, Eugenie underwent a successful operation to straighten her spine, having been born with the rare condition of scoliosis. She is now patron of the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital, and her wedding dress was specifically designed with a low back to show her surgery scar. Eugenie explained: "I believe scars tell a story about your past and your future and it's a way of getting rid of a taboo." Her teenage years were relatively well-protected from the media and she was said to be caring, considerate and cheeky. As an 18-year-old, she was reprimanded by her boarding school after she was reportedly caught running around naked. It was reported that a senior staff member was woken by playful shrieks and found about a dozen young women dancing around without any clothes in the college grounds. Eugenie took combined studies of English, history of art and politics at Newcastle University, lived in £96-a-week halls and then in a student house and graduated with a 2:1. She is now is a director at the contemporary art gallery Hauser & Wirth in London, and is passionate about art, citing Jean-Michel Basquiat, the pioneering prodigy of the 1980s New York art scene, as a hero. The princess posed for fashion magazine Harper's Bazaar in 2018, and shared the secrets of a day in her life, revealing that she shops at Waitrose, does her make-up in the car, finds heels tricky to walk in and likes to watch zombie drama The Walking Dead. She listed chips, Diet Coke and cashew nuts as her indulgences, and vodka with soda and lime as her favourite tipple. Her romance with Stowe-educated Mr Brooksbank, a brand manager for George Clooney's tequila firm, began after they fell in love at first sight on a ski trip. Eugenie is close to both her parents, calling them Mumsy and Papa, and saying: "They are the best divorced couple I know. They just always went out of their way to make us feel loved and secure." In her Instagram posts, she pokes fun at herself through family photos including one of her as a youngster "stifling a yawn on the steps of St Paul's in a full pink suit". She is very close to her sister, whom she calls "Bea" or "Beabea". "Like all sisters we have silly arguments about unimportant stuff, but we do love each other to death," she has said. The princess is not a full-time working royal, but is a regular at Ascot and Trooping the Colour and also puts in appearances at royal garden parties and major celebrations and jubilees. Eugenie is also patron of several charities including the Elephant Family, the Teenage Cancer Trust, the Coronet Theatre and the European School of Osteopathy. Published: 23/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub

Covid 19 Nurse and mother of three 36 in critical condition

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Covid-19: Nurse and mother-of-three, 36, in critical condition A 36-year-old nurse and mother-of-three is on a ventilator in intensive care after contracting coronavirus. Areema Nasreen is being treated at Walsall Manor Hospital in the West Midlands where she works and is in a critical condition. Her sister, Kazeema Nasreen, who works as a healthcare assistant at the same hospital, said the family thinks she could have picked it up "virtually anywhere". The 22-year-old said her sister, from Walsall, was on annual leave when she first started showing symptoms and does not think she picked it up at work. She confirmed her sister is currently in a critical condition and on a ventilator, but "making tiny little progress". Kazeema Nasreen has urged everyone to "take coronavirus seriously". She said: "My sister who is an amazing nurse on the front line and who always helps so many has now caught this virus. "She is critically ill in ICU (intensive care unit), on a ventilator and fighting for her life. "I want everyone to know how dangerous this is. My sister is only 36 and is normally fit and healthy. "People are not taking this seriously enough. She is young - it is not just the elderly who are at risk." She said the family are "heartbroken" but she praised the staff at Walsall Manor Hospital who have gone "above and beyond" in their care for her sister. "Areema loves the NHS," she said. "Her colleagues are like a second family and they have been truly amazing with her - and us. "They are keeping us all strong and doing everything they can for her." Published: 23/03/2020 by Radio NewsHub